Weather: Tropical Strom Julia strengthens into Hurricane, hits Nicaragua

There is no activity in the Tropical Atlantic or the Caribbean as of Sunday morning. However, the Disaster Management Coordination Agency, DMCA, continues to monitor the Tropical Atlantic as it's not unusual for the tropics to remain active in October.

Weather: Tropical Strom Julia strengthens into Hurricane, hits Nicaragua
Weather: Tropical Strom Julia strengthens into Hurricane, hits Nicaragua

Caribbean: There is no activity in the Tropical Atlantic or the Caribbean as of Sunday morning. However, the Disaster Management Coordination Agency, DMCA, continues to monitor the Tropical Atlantic as it’s not unusual for the tropics to remain active in October. October is ranked as the third-most active (behind September and August) for tropical activity in the Atlantic Basin, typically producing about two named storms each year, one of which becomes a hurricane.

Meantime, Tropical Storm Julia Strengthens Into a Hurricane early Saturday evening. Early Sunday morning, Hurricane Julia made landfall in Nicaragua. Meteorologists warned that life-threatening impacts were expected in the country and throughout much of Central America, with flooding rain expected to fall, even in locations well away from the coast.

DMCA is urging residents to pay close attention to information issued by the DMCA, be vigilant as things can change, and the 2022 Atlantic Hurricane season is not over yet. Remember it only takes one storm to make it a memorable season, and October historically is a sneaky month for hurricanes.

An dynamic trough system produced pockets of moderate to heavy rainfall in the Lesser Antilles this afternoon with mainly large areas of rain continuing this evening with a few showers north of Barbados currently(2nd pic). 

The heaviest accumulations were not as widespread on the islands, with the most being 1-2 inches or 25-50mm inches in small areas. Luckily the heaviest 6 hour rainfall fell west of St. Vincent/WSW of Saint Lucia

250mm fell in 6 hours according to Barbados Radar. Upper troughs can cause rapid rain rates and can be hard to predict where this would occur or if they will hit or miss an island. 

That maximum would have cause significant flooding if it occurred on land. In the image you can also see several areas with pockets of heavy rainfall that missed the islands. Risk for flooding and landslides continue.

Conditions for enhanced rainfall continues tomorrow and by Tuesday another surface trough, part of what used to be the last depression, will bring showers and isolated thunderstorms.