St Vincent: Update on La Soufriere volcano

According to UWI Seismic Research Centre, the seismic activity at the La Soufriere volcano has remained low since 22 April 2021.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines: According to UWI Seismic Research Centre, the seismic activity at the La Soufriere volcano has remained low since 22 April 2021. 

There was an ash venting and tremor associated with the explosion that took place on 22 April 2021. In the last 24 hours, a few long-period and volcano-tectonic earthquakes have been reported. 

The La Soufriere volcano continues to be in the state of unrest. It is believed that intensification inactivity could take place with little or without any warning. The alert level of the volcano remains at Orange Level. 

UWI seismic research centre further informed that despite this, a persistent steaming is visible from the observatory once the cloud cover is high enough and thermal anomalies continue to be detected by the alert system of NASA firms. These have been tenacious since after the explosion of 22 April. 

UWI seismic centre added that “These thermal anomalies symbolise that still there is a source of heat within the crater and are most likely from a small body of magma left over, close to the floor of the Summit Crater.”

According to the update, the measurements of the sulphur dioxide- SO2 flux at La Soufrière were carried out by a boat off the west coast on 25 and 27 May. 

Several traverses were finished and yielded at an average SO2 flux of 464 and 242 tons per day, respectively. SO2 could be an indicator that fresh magma from a deeper source is getting degassed.

For any further information regarding the volcanic ash and resources, people can visit the International Volcanic Hazard Health Network  www.ivhhn.org/information.

The La Soufriere volcano started erupting on 27 December 2020, and further effusively eruptions from the volcano took place in the month of April. According to reports, it is estimated that around 40 per cent of the population was displaced.