Read: National Hurricane Centre shares Atlantic tropical cyclones names for 2022 

The sequence of the names of the Atlantic cyclones for 2022 will be Nicole, Owen, Paula, Richard, Shary, Tobias, Virginie and Walter, Alex Colin, Bonnie, Danielle, Earl, Fiona, Gaston, Hermine, Ian, Julia, Karl, Lisa, Martin.  

Read: National Hurricane Centre shares Atlantic tropical cyclones names for 2022 
Read: National Hurricane Centre shares Atlantic tropical cyclones names for 2022 

Caribbean: The National Hurricane Centre has issued an official list of the names of the Atlantic tropical cyclones names for 2022 as the Atlantic Hurricane season started on Wednesday, June 1, 2022. 

The sequence of the names of the Atlantic cyclones for 2022 will be Nicole, Owen, Paula, Richard, Shary, Tobias, Virginie and Walter, Alex Colin, Bonnie, Danielle, Earl, Fiona, Gaston, Hermine, Ian, Julia, Karl, Lisa, Martin.  

The National Hurricane Centre further stated that one of the names of the Hurricanes is exhausted, and various meteorologists would begin pulling from the supplemental list of names in alphabetical order.

In addition to that, with more modern monikers in this group, the supplemental list of the Hurricane and cyclones sounds a lot like the roll call for an American kindergarten class: Jacobus, Kenzie, Lucio, Makayla, Nolan, Orlanda, Pax, Ronin, Sophie, Tayshaun, Viviana and Will, Adria, Braylen, Caridad, Deshawn, Emery, Foster, Gemma, Heath, Isla, .

Further, the National Hurricane Centre also outlined the names for the Atlantic cyclones 2023 season are: Arlene, Bret, Cindy, Don, Emily, Franklin, Gert, Harold, Idalia, Jose, Katia, Lee, Margot, Nigel, Ophelia, Philippe, Rina, Sean, Tammy, Vince and Whitney.

Forecasters are monitoring two disturbances on Wednesday, which also happens to mark the official start of the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season. Both disturbances pose no threat to Montserrat.

The National Hurricane Center gives a disturbance 1 in the Gulf has an 80% chance of developing before the end of the week.

Forecasters say the second disturbance has a low 10% chance of development in the next two to five days as it moves east-northeast over the next several days, away from the southeastern U.S.

The Disaster Management Coordination Agency, DMCA will continue to monitor the Atlantic and, all residents and visitors are urged to be prepared for what forecasters say will be an above-average hurricane season.