PM Rowley pays condolences to Master Artist Clarke

Prime minister of Trinidad and Tobago paid condolences to Master Artist LeRoy Clarke on Wednesday, 29th July 2021, who died at the age of 83. 

T&T prime minister with Master Artist LeRoy Clarke (File Pic )
T&T prime minister with Master Artist LeRoy Clarke (File Pic )

Trinidad and Tobago: Prime minister of Trinidad and Tobago paid condolences to Master Artist LeRoy Clarke on Wednesday, 29th July 2021, who died at the age of 83. 

Notably, Clarke was born in Belmont in November 1938, and in the last years of his life, he lived in Cascade.

PM Rowley said, “He championed respect and personal responsibility and provided inspiration with confidence to a nation which frequently chooses shades of darkness instead of enlightenment.”

He further added that, Clarke spoke his truth forcefully and unapologetically with empathy and vision.

“We are poorer for no longer having him in our presence, but thankfully, he left us a legacy of writings and canvas that will forever enrich us for generations to come,” Rowley added.

“He strived to be the best he could be, and he worked real hard at it. He never looked for a break. He made his own breaks and he took responsibility for his life and for his career,” Kunle remembered his colleague with these words.

Clarke gained several prestigious awards during his lifetime, including National Living Treasure from Trinidad Hilton and Conference Centre.

Moreover, He was also the first local artist to be vested with the title “Master Artist” by the National Museum of T&T, the winner of an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Trinidad and Tobago (UTT).

In addition, he was garlanded by NAEAP, the National Association for the Empowerment of African People, with the Achievement of Excellence Award.

In the year of 2003 Government of Trinidad and Tobago tagged him as “National Icon.”

Also, he was the first person to be given the title “Master Artist” by the National Museum and Art Gallery of Trinidad and Tobago.

 As an anti-colonialist activist, Clarke, who also began his professional writing in his early 20s, was often described as the “controversial artist” because of his intricate yet blunt expressions on the canvas that often spoke to societal and cultural taboo subjects.