Let us in St. Kitts & Nevis adhere to CDC guidelines, face Masks wearing: Dr. Douglas

Dr. Denzil Llewellyn Douglas, 2nd prime minister of St. Kitts & Nevis, & the St. Kitts-Nevis Labour Party's political leader, made remarks on decreases in cases of coronavirus in India. 

St Kitts and Nevis: Dr. Denzil Llewellyn Douglas, 2nd prime minister of St. Kitts & Nevis, & the St. Kitts-Nevis Labour Party’s political leader, made remarks on decreases in cases of coronavirus in India. 

He said that several factors helped India to fight against coronavirus , Wearing Face Masks, Herd immunity,& others. 

Health Experts have suggested many viable explanations for the sudden drop seen in almost every region, including that some parts of the country may have reached herd immunity or that Indians may have some pre-existing security from the virus.

The Indian government has also partly attributed the decline in cases to mask-wearing, which is compulsory in public in India, with violations drawing massive fines in some cities.

Determining what is behind the decline in infections could help authorities control the country’s virus, which has reported nearly 11 million cases and more than 155,000 deaths.

Among the possible explanations for the fall in cases is that some large areas have reached herd immunity – the gate at which enough people have developed immunity to the virus by falling sick or being vaccinated.

But experts have warned that even if herd immunity in some places is partially responsible for the decline, the population as a whole continues vulnerable – and must continue to take precautions.

This is particularly true because new research recommends that people infected with one strain of the virus could be re-infected by a new strain.

A national screening for antibodies by Indian health agencies estimated that about 270 million, or one in five Indians, had been affected by the virus before vaccinations started – far under the rate of 70 percent or higher that specialists say might be the start for the coronavirus, though even that is not certain.

But the survey offered other insight into why India’s infections might be falling.

It showed that more people had been infected in India’s cities than in its villages and that the virus was moving more slowly through the rural hinterland.

“In rural areas, the transmission rates are in any case low, and we are two-thirds rural. That’s something that we must keep reminding ourselves,” said Dr. K Srinath Reddy, president of the Public Health Foundation of India.

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